1 Blogging Assumption You Don’t Want to Make

Have you ever seen a successful blogger and believed that things must have come easy to them?

Or maybe you assume that an established, pro blogger is a natural, someone blessed with immense talents that they never needed to work at.

Some people tell me that I make blogging look easy. From how I write to my videos to much of what I do online, folks tend to believe that this journey was simple, seamless, effortless and tremendously easy for me.

I can assure you it was not always easy for me. Blogging was quite difficult for me. For many years.

Watch this video as I explain:

The Assumption

Assuming that successful bloggers are succeeding because blogging has always been easy for them is a dangerous assumption. Most bloggers had difficult months or years before seeing steady, growing success.

The reason why this assumption hurts you is because if you believe that bloggers succeed only because blogging is an easy, comfortable, walk in the park for them you handcuff yourself with a dangerous, struggling-inducing, limiting belief.

How it works: you see a blogger succeeding because it comes easy to them. Since blogging doesn’t seem to come easy to you, it is simple to make an excuse for your failure. Namely, you are not a natural, nor gifted, nor does blogging come easy to you, so you will struggle and fail forever with blogging.

You can never succeed by dismpowering yourself with such a ridiculous, dangerous, limiting excuse. But you can succeed if you understand that successful bloggers tend to face greater struggles and more failure than any bloggers on earth.

I went into dire financial straits before finding my blogging mojo. I struggled to gain traffic, to get social shares and to get blog comments on my old blog. But I did not assume that traffic, social shares, blog comments or profits came easily to successful bloggers. Success rarely flows to any blogger with ease because we all have deep fears to embrace, to feel and to release before success makes a beeline for us.

This fear-embracing process tends to take months or years because you need to patiently practice writing and connecting with friends and creating helpful content for a while before you become a skilled, established blogger.

We all need to pay our blogging dues to become really good at what we do. If you assume otherwise you will never pay the dues you need to pay to become skilled, professional, prospering bloggers.

The Solution

Own this dangerous assumption. Realize that you genuinely believe successful bloggers always found blogging easy, coasting through obstacles, dissolving resistance at the snap of their fingers and sometimes never facing any roadblocks during their journeys.

Let go the idea that you are failing because blogging isn’t easy for you. Blogging is not easy for anybody at the beginning and most bloggers find it difficult until they put in the work, practicing their skills for years.

Goodness knows I spent years having a helluva time blogging because I had to face, own and release a litany of BS limiting beliefs before I could build a sustainable, profitable venture through this blogging bit.

Bonus Tip

Dive into your fun. What can you gab about all day long? Blog about it.

If you blog mainly for fun you will put in the work and pay your dues to become a successful blogger because the work/play/fun with be the reward. Profits and traffic and social shares will feel like extra, or icing on the cake.

You will never assume that successful bloggers had it easy because you will quickly learn the amount of time, energy, work and full commitment it takes to become a professional, successful blogger.

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Disclosure: In full disclosure, it is safe to assume that the site owner is benefiting financially or otherwise from everything you click on, read, or look at while on my website. This is not to say that is the case with all content, as all publications on the site are original and written to provide value and references to our audience.

2 Comments

  1. Shantanu Sinha September 7, 2017
  2. Benjamin Ehinger September 7, 2017