How to Keep Blogging When You Want to Quit

You’ve hit *that* point.

After weeks, months or even years of blogging you want to quit.

You are sick of seeing no growth. Profits are scant. Traffic? Non-existent.

Everything seems to be going against you.

I have been there. I know how rough this journey gets at times.

I also know how to keep going despite feeling like you want to quit blogging.

If you can see the sweet rewards at the end of the blogging tunnel you will keep at it until you succeed.

Follow these 4 tips to keep blogging when you feel like quitting.

1: Take a Break

This seems counter productive but taking a break is the easiest way to get back on blogging track.

I hardly felt like quitting blogging earlier today but did feel burned out from writing 2-3 guest posts daily while blog commenting, checking email and responding on social media. I simply pulled back from blogging for a few hours. I watched some Netflix. Relaxed. Then I returned to blogging with vim and vigor to write this post.

Your blogging break may span 1-2 days or even a few weeks. Whatever time frame, focus on pulling back to rest your body, to recharge and to see clearly.

2: Reassess Your Reason Why

If you want to quit you:

  • forgot why you started blogging
  • picked a weak reason why you started blogging
  • picked the wrong reason to start a blog

Without fail, 9 of 10 bloggers want to quit because they started blogging mainly to make money. When they realize their blog is not an ATM machine they lose the reason to blog. Since money was your driver if money doesn’t show up you either quit blogging or ponder quitting.

Blog to have fun. Blog to free yourself. Feel free to build a full time career through blogging. It is OK to want to make money blogging but devote most of your energies to having fun and serving others through blogging. If you do this you will have ample energy to get through all the peaks and valleys we all face. You will also rarely think about quitting because few people willingly quit something they are doing for the joy of doing it.

3: Count Small Victories

Count small victories. Count all victories. Realize that your blogging efforts are paying off. Even if you haven’t earned any income yet, or have yet to have a groundbreaking victory, the small stuff counts in more ways than you could ever believe.

If you have 2 visitors you are ahead of the days you had zero visitors to your blog. Celebrate your first blog comment. Celebrate the first blog comment you publish on a top blog. Celebrate anything that indicates you are becoming a presence online.

You can even count buying your domain and hosting as a win. Few folks make this decision to free themselves through blogging.

4: Follow the Pros

When you want to quit blogging pro bloggers can inspire you to keep going through their stunning success.

Think of the top bloggers in your niche. Seeing their success goads you on.

Pros also offer top shelf advice to help you persist despite the ups and downs of blogging. They give you solid, proven tips to work from. This enables you to blog with confidence and clarity even when things don’t seem to be going anywhere.

Subscribe to top blogs. Follow each post. Take notes. Persist by following proven strategies. Know that what you are doing will pay off down the road as it paid off for successful, established pro blogger.

Video

Do you feel like a blogging fraud? This sneaky feeling often goads bloggers into quitting. Believing that you have no right to teach others because you are struggling yourself.

Watch me explain how to get through this feeling:

 

Your Turn

What tips can you add to this list?

  • 14
  •  
  •  
  • 2
  • 3

Disclosure: In full disclosure, it is safe to assume that the site owner is benefiting financially or otherwise from everything you click on, read, or look at while on my website. This is not to say that is the case with all content, as all publications on the site are original and written to provide value and references to our audience.

2 Comments

  1. Bren Pace May 14, 2017
    • Ryan Biddulph May 16, 2017