Less than 5% of Men Cited Reading Blogs as their Favourite Online Activity

So when you wrote that piece about how you loved Phil Neville’s commentating style during the FIFA World Cup 2014, the men you were hoping would lap it up, quite probably didn’t. That is, of course, unless you carried out some research of your own and found that’s exactly what your male audience was crying out for.

For those that didn’t want to read a blog post, not only might you have turned them off (or bypassed them completely) by choosing that channel, your praise for Phil Neville’s commentary style may well have done the same. But at least a bad reaction is better than no reaction at all.

A recent study [infographic] revealed that unlike the 7% of women who said reading blogs was their favorite online activity, more than 95% of men chose social media, games, videos or other types of content as theirs. Admittedly neither party was overly enamored with blogs, so while they can be an easy way to add active content to your website, you might be completely wasting your time. So how do you know?

Men vs. Women Blogging

Conduct your own research

Finding out what people do and don’t like doesn’t have to be costly. If budgets are tight or content just isn’t on senior management’s radar – it’s free to ask your customers what they want via social media. If you’ve got a bit more time on your hands, basic metrics from Google Analytics will tell you things like your top landing pages, how long people spend on a particular page (and therefore how interesting/engaging it is), as well as the route they take around your site. These are all insights into their behavior and what they enjoy looking at online.

Look at what your competitors are doing

Nobody wants to be late to a trend, but getting a feel for the kind of content people go crazy for and reacting to it can be a good place to start. Sometimes it’s a good first step into the world of creating content that works. Sometimes a great way to achieve success is by taking an idea that’s been done, and creating something bigger, better and more shareable.

What’s being shared?

Dig around on Twitter and Facebook – what are people liking/sharing/commenting on? Is there something relevant to your brand/business that you can pick up on? Even if your starting point is as simple as getting involved in a discussion on a particular hashtag, you might find you pick up a few more followers and at the same time start building a picture of your audience.

Enlist the help of analysts

If the thought of research or analysis fills you with dread, there are plenty of companies and lots of available software on hand to help you know your audience. Have a dig around, maybe even try a few out – there are plenty that will offer you a free trial. If you make good use of Twitter, a great tool to analyse your followers is Followerwonk.

 

Soon you’ll know exactly what content your audience likes and the tasks of planning, creating, publishing and analysing content will become something that delivers satisfaction, not nightmares. And when you can show the powers that be just how much can be achieved from content, your business cred will soar and we think most of our readers would probably like a pat on the back.

For more related tips, check out this great post which can be used to help blogging as well as social media efforts.

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Disclosure: In full disclosure, it is safe to assume that the site owner is benefiting financially or otherwise from everything you click on, read, or look at while on my website. This is not to say that is the case with all content, as all publications on the site are original and written to provide value and references to our audience.

2 Comments

  1. Ryan Biddulph August 30, 2014
  2. Philos September 1, 2014