OMG: The Web is Changing Language

The easy test that something has become really successful on the Internet is simple—someone is trying to make money off it. That’s the case with social media and the entrepreneurs that have been figuring out ways to advertise on the web for several years now but lately the move toward cashing in is gathering steam with some pretty big names in the industry.

In fact the people at ReadWriteWeb have been following the trends so closely they’ve even got a new zine out called ReadWriteMobile and the latest issues has a great blurb on Google’s new ap billing platform for mobile Andriod users. When this latest app does is allow users to sell items within their mobile applications and use Goggle checkout to bill. All this moves the world of online commerce closer to an instantaneous experience. It seems like such a long time ago that people were hesitant about using their credit cards to make purchases on that new fangled thing called the Internet. For now the new system will be for selling digital content.

Another interesting article is closer to home to those of us who write for a living specifically on the Internet and when you think about it, it should be no surprise that some people are saying that the web is changing the way we use language. It seems that some of the texting language that is commonly used like OMG and LOL is actually being added to the Oxford dictionary. Now it goes without saying that some people are going to be more than a little upset with what they see as the proliferation of illiteracy, but like any other debate there’s another side to the story.

Recently, I saw some academics on television that were talking about how emails and texting had actually started to effect the literacy standards. However, these high brow types from places like Stanford and the University of Toronto had an unexpected slant on the whole thing. They were actually in favor of, or at least resigned to the changes in our lingo and felt that any literacy was in fact a good thing. The point is that there will always be people that get uptight about the slang that’s being used at any given time, but even back in the day the people who were saying things like “groovy” and “far out” weren’t likely to use those words in place of more proper English on their term papers.

Still there are people who guard their language closely and even in their opposition to the Internet based abbreviations being added to the Oxford dictionary, their comments show the same wit as their Internet based counterparts. One that was recently published says the use of the abbreviations is like the New York Times using emoticons in their headlines. Good point but it seems hard to argue against that fact that more people would be attracted to the New York Times if analysis about the middle east carried a smiley face at the top.

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2 Comments

  1. picture framing March 29, 2011
  2. Antown May 27, 2011