Writing the Infamous Prediction Post: 2010

It’s that time of year: prediction posts are upon us. If you’ve been involved in blogging for the past few years, even from an observational standpoint, you are probably familiar with the unavoidable prediction posts that come just prior to the turn of the year. Bloggers aim to do a prediction post every year, as it helps to establish their authority and push their blogging career forward.

The area in which you blog is unlikely to be of importance when it comes to prediction posts; nearly every industry has an air of expectation surrounding it, which is a curiously interesting topic of discussion right around New Year’s Eve. Heightened excitement for a new year means new opportunities on a personal and professional level, whether you’re an individual or an entire entity. New fiscal years, new calendar years, new semesters and new resolutions. All around, the new year presents everyone and everything with a generally clean slate.

For bloggers, the new year also presents an opportunity to get a jump start on establishing their authority as a published writer. Nothing tests your authority more than a prediction post, so the better you can call the occurrences of the next twelve months, the more respected you will be in your area of interest.

It’s a lot of pressure, but it’s a good exercise to endure, even if only for practice purposes in preparation for next year.

Start off by going over the articles you’ve written in the past year. Skim through the titles just to get an idea of what you’ve covered in previous months. From there, you can get an idea of the topics you know best, as you covered them a great deal over the course of a year. It may be a good idea to focus your prediction post around the topics mentioned most frequently in your articles.

Additionally you can take cues from traffic influxes. Study your top traffic days and see which articles correlate with high traffic. These are articles that were well liked by your readers, and were likely of some importance in the past year’s time line. Read the comments for these popular posts to gain a better idea on the importance of these posts, giving you plenty of fodder for a prediction post.

Do additional research at this point, seeking out the history of your primary topics of interest. Through research you can study various patterns in industry behavior, giving you a decent indication of what is likely to occur over the next twelve months. Regardless of previous behavior, it is still necessary to factor in current trends and effects, as variables such as economic hardships can make the future even more difficult to predict. if you’re at a loss because of this, try factoring in that variable along with your future predictions.

For instance, a discussion on the future of virtual goods could be considered a touchy topic because of the unknown expectations around current consumer behavior and the response to a new type of product. However, the fact that virtual goods could become attractive alternatives to spending more money on tangible products, along with subsidized pricing from ads and the inexpensive price tags attached to most virtual goods products, the present economic attitude may end up fostering the growth of a virtual goods economy.

With these tips and tricks you can make the task of creating a prediction post less daunting and more inviting. Don’t let fear or a lack of confidence steer you away from at least trying your hand. Start small and work your way up, recognizing that a prediction post can generate a great deal of residual traffic while also giving you the chance at a follow up post (i.e. second try) exactly one year from now.

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